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Boomers

Is the Baby Boom generation really that different?

In many respects, the answer is no, but there are important ways the 78 million people born from the end of World War II to 1964 are distinguishable from all previous generations. The distinctiveness is not just in the numbers, but also in values, life choices, and longevity.

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Health care and retirement saving keep people on the job.

How many older Americans are working full time -- any why? Here's eye-opening research on work from Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI):

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Excercise gently

Are you a weekend warrior?

Aging puts some limits on how long and how intensely you can exercise. Growing older also makes you more prone to injuries during physical activity. Boomers can be at particular risk though, because they might just be discovering their bodies aren't as young as they used to be. By all means, exercise to stay in shape, but take precautions to prevent injuries.

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Try these wonderful ways for grandparents to spend terrific time with grandkids.

"What do you wanna do? I dunno -- what do you wanna do?" These words are all too familiar between grandparents and grandkids looking to spend time together. The goal is to really spend time together: talking, relating, sharing unique life adventures. After all, grandparents have so much wisdom to offer. And kids, well, grandparents never experienced being a kid in this millennium, so the youger generation has something to share, too. If you're in San Diego or Southern California, try these fun ideas. If you're somewhere else, look for similar opportunities in your town (or come visit San Diego).

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Lovely garden

Let your garden help you choose the right plants for it.

Does this sound familiar? You drive to your local big box store, ready to buy some plants to spruce up your garden. Park the car, walk into the nursery section and suddenly, you are confused. The plants mostly look the same. And there are so many you have no idea which to choose. You stand there wondering, "Am I the only person to feel so overwhelmed?"

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Hera Dore, RN, MSN

Hera Dore, RN, MSN manages the Surgical Acute Care and Oncology Units at Sharp Memorial Hospital in San Diego. She has been a nurse since 1980 and has worked with a variety of patient age groups and families. In her role as a manager, Hera is involved with the patients as well as the staff. Her past experiences include Critical Care, staff development, and education. She received her Master's Degree in Nursing from the University of Texas in Houston in 1992.
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Adult incontinence is common, yet it can be a difficult subject to discuss with family, friends, and even physicians.

Adult incontinence is much more prevalent in the United States than you might think. According to the National Association of Continence (NAFC, 2006), approximately 25 million adults in this country have experienced incontinence at some point in their lives. In fact, this number may be higher as most adults, especially men, won't admit or are embarrassed to discuss this condition with their healthcare provider, family, or friends. And 75-80 percent of those suffering incontinence are women.

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Protect Your Eyes

You can and should slow Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

Boomers beware: Scientists predict a surge in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Every year more than two million people in the U.S. discover they have this incurable disease of the retina, which destroys functional vision.

Here are answers to frequently asked questions about age-related macular degeneration.

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Brain Power

What you eat isn't only fuel for your body, it's also fuel for your brain.

We've all heard "use it or lose it." This is especially true when it comes to protecting your brain's cognitive health. Cognitive health refers to healthy brain function, and to the skills people use everyday, such as: the ability to learn, remember, make decisions, think abstractly, reason, and even appreciate beauty. However, many Americans don't pay attention to their brain health, which can potentially lead to poor health, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease.

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